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FCC Pauses Several Telecom Rules To Help With Hurricane Recovery In Puerto Rico

FCC Pauses Several Telecom Rules To Help With Hurricane Recovery

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The Federal Communication Commission (FCC) announced a pause on a Puerto Rican telecom rule Monday due to the expected recovery timeline for Hurricane Fiona.

The rule, which forces cell phone providers to reassign cell phone numbers after 90 days of deactivation, was lifted pending a lengthy recovery effort.

“Cancellation of [the rule] will allow service providers in the affected areas, at the request of customers, to temporarily disconnect customers’ telephone service to avoid billing issues, and then restore the same numbers to customers when the service is reconnected,” the FCC said in a statement. announcement. “This waiver applies to all businesses that provide service in areas of Puerto Rico affected by Hurricane Fiona. This waiver is effective immediately and for a period of nine months, expiring on June 20, 2023.”

The rule break is part of FCC efforts this week regarding Puerto Rico’s recovery efforts from Hurricane Fiona, which decimated the island just five years after Hurricane Maria hit. The storm dropped between six and eight inches of rain earlier this week, leaving parts of the island without electricity or running water.

President Jessica Rosenworcel released from prison pronunciation about the damage, saying the FCC is “assessing the impact on communications services and infrastructure and issuing public reports on a daily basis to keep people informed” and “will work closely with government partners and communications providers to support recovery efforts as families and residents across the island.” start rebuilding.”

The FCC also has a daily report of communications outages in Puerto Rico, which found that more than 30 percent of mobile sites were down due to damage or preventative measures. Power outages rose from 24.3 percent on Sunday.

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